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Re: The Iraos Empire

Posted: Fri Jun 01, 2012 11:54 pm
by Orion
King Jordan Kennedy wrote:Just like Sealand or the Principiltity in Australia, The Government would most likely just leave the person alone.
Sealand has had plenty of conflict with the British government. And in reality the "occupants" of Sealand are glorified squatters that disperse like flies whenever the government comes calling. While the concept of Sealand may have sparked many ideas for micronationalism, the actuality is far from being a worthy role model.

Having researched it to death over the past decade, I can only say that the most viable path to a secessionist state is to simply not secede - find a legal loophole instead.

Re: The Iraos Empire

Posted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 9:01 am
by King Jordan Kennedy
Yes, Ryan you are correct. Also i would still be a citizen of Ireland as well. Thats like saying that when you leave the UK or USA on holidays you don't have to pay your taxes. When you come back into the country you would have to.

Re: The Iraos Empire

Posted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 10:58 am
by pawelabrams
You can still make it a semi-independent country; claiming full sovereignity would be a casus belli - end when something is a "good reason to start a war", it might as well be considered as treason even under the paragraph you cited.

Semi-sovereign countries manage to survive though; I've heard about some self-declared 'principality' in northern Italy, or some settlement in Poland that has similar status.

Re: The Iraos Empire

Posted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 2:35 pm
by Malliki Tosha
pawelabrams wrote:You can still make it a semi-independent country; claiming full sovereignity would be a casus belli - end when something is a "good reason to start a war", it might as well be considered as treason even under the paragraph you cited.

Semi-sovereign countries manage to survive though; I've heard about some self-declared 'principality' in northern Italy, or some settlement in Poland that has similar status.
Problem is that they aren't semi-independent. They are tolerated as tourist attractions, nothing more.

"Thanks to Seborga's publicity as a principality, tourism has expanded in recent years."

"The Republic of Italy and international institutions consider and treat Seborga (unlike San Marino or Vatican City State, enclaved in the peninsula) as an integral part of the territory of Italy. Moreover, there is no tension between the Principality of Seborga and the Italian government, because the Principality has only a symbolic value. Law enforcement, public health, telecommunications, school services and all other public services are provided as in the rest of Italy. Seborgans regularly pay taxes, participate in the Italian administrative life, and vote in local and national (Italian) elections."

There is also the Republic of Jämtland in Sweden, which is also a tourist attraction and a source of local pride.

To be counted as independent, you have to have control of your territory and have a monopoly on violence, among other things. Seborga doesn't have that and is therefore neither independent or even semi-independent. An island off the coast of Ireland would also have neither, regardless of what this little boy does.

Re: The Iraos Empire

Posted: Sat Jun 02, 2012 5:19 pm
by Orion
Seborga provides some benefit to the local community. It creates a product base for tourism; postage stamps, passports, clothing, flags, titles, etc, can all be marketed and merchandized. These in turn help to stimulate the local economy, and thereby helps the community. Since the Seborgans don't go beyond the scope of titular claims, the Italian government hasn't seen reason to intervene and break up the micronation. They did just that with Rose Island in the Adriatic when someone tried to build a micronation on a sea platform - the military came in and razed the place.

Titular micronations, like Seborga, Molossia and others are just that - a title. They may claim to have seceded, but in the end they still pay their dues to their true sovereign. Tolerance for these particular micronations tend to be granted when the micronation benefits the community with which it is involved. Without the support of the people/community, and when there is no beneficial trade off (meaning the micronational government is not providing a service), then a micronation with serious intentions doesn't stand a chance.